Afib and Weight Loss

This is HUGE news!

 

Overweight people with atrial fibrillation can reduce or reverse the effects of the condition by losing weight, according to a landmark study that suggests the lifestyle intervention is a good alternative to surgical or drug intervention.

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Researchers from the University of Adelaide found that losing 10 percent of weight, along with managing associated risk factors, can reverse the progression of the disease.

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They studied 355 people with a BMI greater than 27kg/m2 who lost varying amounts of weight.

Eighty-eight percent of those who lost 10 percent of their body weight reversed from persistent to paroxysmal or no AF, the researchers report in the journal EP Europace.

The 45% of patients who lost even more weight didn’t require any ablation and a further 37% required only single ablation.

“Without weight loss, there is a progression of AF to more persistent forms of AF.”

The study adds to a growing body of evidence that risk-factor management to treat the primary cause of the disease halts the “vicious cycle”, the authors conclude.

Time to hit the walking track – no more excuses…

From Our Friends at: pharmacynews.com.au

You can access the study here.

 

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1 Comment

  1. There is a dispute between my heart Dr and another hospital where I was taken to the emergency room by ambulance because I called 911 because my heart was pounding in my chest. The 2 paramedics were arguing in the ambulance if I was in a-fib or not. My blood pressure was 170/100. I had no other symptoms. I felt fine. Then 30 minutes later at the ER they told me I was back in sinus rhythm which just happened by itself. The dr also said the report shows I have blood loss to all my organs. When the reports were sent to my heart Dr a few days later I told him that ER dr told me that, my heart Dr said he didn’t know what he meant by that. Here is an example of answers I am not getting. My heart Dr also he didn’t see a-fib readings from the hospital reports and that a-fib lasts 48 hours. Is that true? I had been on a strict calorie diet for 5 days and ate some very salty food at my sons wedding tasting the nite before. Can being low on potassium or dehydrated cause a-fib? Also I have had palpitations for 5 years now and that is getting worse. Do they do an oblation procedure to get rid of palpitations? Also my friend’s sister had a pounding heart problem starting from her honeymoon at 24 to 68 when she had a surgery which cured her and now for 6 years she hasn’t had any more episodes. I wish I could have that freedom from daily palpitations myself. I stopped metoprolol cuz I had ear pain and a sore throat from it. I was at 201 lbs on 3/4 and now I weigh 160 and my palpitations have not gone away at all. Im trying to get down to 125 since I’m 5’5 1/2” tall. I’m on a heart healthy diet since March and check my blood pressure twice a day because my heart Dr’s nurse practitioner told me to. They also gave me a 30 day heart monitor which showed 70 episodes of PAC’s ( sometimes in couplets and atrial runs) and one PVC , sinus rhythm, sinus bradycardia, sinus tachycardia and IVCD illustrated. My heart Dr said no a-fib. At a later visit my heart Dr looked at the hospital’s ecg’s and said well he can see where they might see a-fib and said he doesn’t want to 2nd guess those doctors. And I read people have gotten an esphogeal fistula and died from the oblation procedure! I don’t know what to do! I feel like I’m a walking time bomb and worried about cardiac arrest at any time!!!!

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